In this book more than 50 paintings from famous artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and Correggio, in which they showed that John the Baptist was Jesus!

This slide show contains another 50 paintings, not included in the book, with John=Jesus symbolism.

See and judge for yourself!

Andrea Solario, 1498

John points at the wooden cross in his hand.
The cross is an attribute of Jesus.

Bernhard Strigel, 15th century

John points at the lamb: he is the Lamb of God. His hairdo refers to the lamb.

Alejandro de Loarte (attr.), 17 th century

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner is detached from the wooden cross. John points to himself.

Ercole de’ Roberti, ca. 1480

John look at a standard with the crucified Jesus on it: this is about him!

Follower of Agnolo Bronzino, 1540-1560

John and Jesus both hold the wooden cross. Mary and Jesus look at John, which makes John the central focus of the painting.

Giovanni Francesco Gessi, 17th century

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner is detached from the wooden cross. John look at the banner: he is the Lamb of God!

Jacopo Pontormo, 1527

John holds the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner and points to himself. Jesus tells us by holding up 2 vingers: John and he are one!

Pinturicchio (Bernardino di Betto di Baggio), 15thcentury

John and Jesus hold the cross together. Mary and Jesus look at John’s direction, which makes him the central focus of the painting. The banner is attached to the staff like a (kundalini-) serpent. The pomegranate is a kundalini symbool.

Rusconi Benedetto (Benedetto Diana Venezia), rond 1500

Jesus and John look exactly the same.

Domenichino (Domenico Zampieri), 17thcentury

John points at Jesus and at himself. He holds a wooden cross (without a banner).

Simone Cantarini, 17th century

John holds the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner without pointing at Jesus or at the lamb.

Titiaan (Tiziano Vecelli), 1565

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner is detached from the wooden cross. John holds it in front of himself: he is the Lamb of God!

Andrea Lilli, 17th century

John points at Jesus.
His posture communicates to us: this is me!

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 1660-1665

John points at the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner and at himself: he is the Lamb of God!

Francesco Bacchiacca, ca. 1530

John holds a wooden cross (without a banner). All look at John, which makes him the central focus of the painting.

Benedetto da Rovezzano, 16th century

John holds the cup of the baptism and points at himself: I was the one who received the baptism by the Holy Spirit, I am the Christ!

Giovanni d’Agnolo di Balduccio, 14th century

John points with 2 fingers at Jesus and with 1 finger at the banner (the 2=1-code): Jesus and he are one person!

Andrea Mantegna, 1506

With his hands stretched out to John, Jesus holds 2 fingers together: they are one! The lemons behind John are a symbol of the pineal gland. The palm tree behind Jesus is a symbol of kundalini awakening.

Neapolitan School, 17th century

The intimate embrace with which John holds the lamb communicates to us: he is the Lamb of God.

Venetian School, 17th century

John holds the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner.
He points to himself.

Giovanni Battista Piazzetta, 1740

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner is detached from the wooden cross. John is the Lamb of God.

Dosso Dossi (Giovanni di Niccolò de Luteri), ca.1490-1542

John has the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner. Mary and Jesus look at him. The evangelist John holds a cup with an ascending serpent next to him: a reference to the process of kundalini awakening that made John into the Christ.

Spanish School, follower of José de Ribera, 17th century

The intimate embrace with which John holds the lamb communicates to us: he is the Lamb of God.

Paolo Veronese, ca. 1560

John holds a wooden cross. His posture communicates to us:
he is the Lamb of God!

Frans Floris, circa 1550

John and Jesus have one face.

Andrea Previtali, ca. 1525

John carries the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner (‘See the Lamb of God’) and points at himself, instead of Jesus. Mary communicates with two fingers pressed together: Jesus and John are the same person.

Church of St Cyprian’s in Marylebone, Engeland, ca. 1866

John points at the wooden cross in his hand. The cross is an attribute of Jesus. A symbol of the pineal gland is positioned on the wall, next to John and the cross.

Domenico Puligo, 16th century

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner is detached from the wooden cross. John points to himself with 2 fingers: he is John and Jesus!

Filippino Lippi, 1503

John and Jesus point at each other. Mary and Jesus look at John, which makes John the central focus of the painting.

Giambattista Cima da Conegliano, 1517

Jesus looks at John and shows 2 vingers: they are the same person.

Ippolito Scarsella (Lo Scarsellino), 17th century

John holds a wooden cross (without a banner). The cross is an attribute of Jesus.

Martino Piazza, ca. 1515

Jesus and John look exactly the same.

Nardo di Cione, ca. 1350

John holds a wooden cross. The cross is an attribute of Jesus.

Nicolas Régnier, 17thcentury

John holds a wooden cross. The cross is an attribute of Jesus.

Stained glass, artist unknown

John holds the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner and points to himself.

Pinturicchio (Bernardino di Betto di Baggio), ca 1486

John holds the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner without pointing at Jesus. Mary and Jesus look at John’s direction, which makes him the central focus of the painting.

Adam Elsheimer, ca. 1605

John and the lamb have the same posture: he is the Lamb!

Simone Cantarini, 17th century

John points at Jesus and at himself.

Zaganelli Francesco, 1514

The dove of the holy Spirit hovers over John instead of Jesus.

Titiaan (Tiziano Vecelli), 1555

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner is detached from the wooden cross. John points at himself: he is the Lamb of God!

Sandro Botticelli, ca. 1485

John holds a wooden cross (without a banner).
The cross is an attribute of Jesus.

Stained glass, artist unknown

John points at the Ecce Agnus Dei-banner: he is the Lamb of God!

Il Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri), 1645

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner is detached from the wooden cross.
John looks at it: he is the Lamb of God!

Cristofano Allori, 17th century

John points at the wooden cross: it was he who was crucified!

Juan de Juanes, 1550-1570

John and Jesus hold the cross together.
John points at himself.

Girolamo da Santacroce, 1525-1530

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner is detached from the wooden cross.
John points to himself: he is the Lamb of God!

Francesco del Cossa, 1473

John holds a standard with a lamb at the top: he is the Lamb of God. The salamander at the bottom of the standard, a symbol from the tradition of alchemy, refers to the ‘kundalini serpent’. The red ribbon connected to the standard symbolizes the process of kundalini awakening, as do the pillar, and the string of red coral beads, behind him.

Livio Agresti (attr.), 16th century

The Ecce Agnus Dei-banner spirals around John’s staff like a (kundalini-) serpent. The meaning of the 2 fingers he holds up, is: I have made the two energy currents into one (the kundalini process).

Paolo Veronese (Paolo Caliari), 1550-1560

John and Jesus look alike. John points with his left hand at the tree behind him. A tree is a classic symbol of the kundalini process.

Carlo Crivelli, 1476

John holds a red staff, a reference to the kundalini energy. He points at the banner: he is the Lamb of God. The cloth around his waist (the loop symbolizes the pineal gland), and the goldfinch in the background, also refer to a process of kundalini awakening. The goldfinch is an attribute of Jesus in Christian art.

Andrea del Sarto, 1528-29

John and Jesus both hold the ‘Salvator Mundi’-globe.